March Book Report

March brought with it another round of colds for the whole family and way too many sleep deprived nights. The only upside was afternoons spent reading because it's the only thing I could muster up enough energy for! 

This month was heavier on nonfiction, both because of library holds coming in and because I know my time for concentrated reading is running short. I'm secretly looking forward to the excuse to read fluffier books once the new baby is here, but it's been good to knock a few more deep reads off my list first.

I'm focusing this year on reading with more intention and focus rather than gravitating toward what everyone else is reading. As always, you can check out my criteria for "deep reads" in this post, and you can catch up on past 2018 book reports here.

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Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work by Chip and Dan Heath

 

Deep reading category: Teaches me something specific

Star rating: Four stars

Decision-making has always been tricky for me. I'm very close to straddling the line between Judging and Perceiving on the MBTI (P wins out, but only barely). That means I like decisions made relatively quickly, and I hate the stress of drawing out a decision . . . but I also like to explore all my options to make sure I'm making the best decision, which takes time. Combine that with my strong Feeling type that bases decisions off emotions more than logic, and I'm basically a mess.

Decisive is the perfect resource for changing all that. The Heath brothers dig deep into the statistics and psychology of decision making for everyone from big-shot CEOs considering a corporate buyout to your average twenty-something wondering if she should break up with her boyfriend. They provide straightforward steps anyone can take to evaluate their decision and make the best choice possible.

My only problem (and the reason I docked a star) is that there are SO many steps to evaluate a decision from all angles. It's impractical that anyone would remember all of them, much less have time to apply them to every major decision they face. I wish this book had shared more practical tips for day-to-day decision making, those little things that aren't groundbreaking but that can add up to a big impact over time.

Bottom line: Worth a read for anyone interested in the topic. I guarantee you'll learn something, whether you make decisions logically or intuitively.

Dinner: A Love Story by Jenny Rosenstrach

 

Deep reading category: Teaches me something specific

Star rating: Five stars

I picked this one up at Half-Price Books after my podcast cohost Abbie gave it a rave review, and I'm so glad I did. Food narratives hold a special place in my heart, but their structure can vary quite a bit. Some lean more heavily toward being a traditional cookbook, while others are basically essays with a recipe tossed in every now and then for good measure. Rosenstrach strikes the perfect balance in Dinner: A Love Story, with a nearly 50/50 split between recipes and the stories of how they came to be.

The best part? These are the chronicles of a foodie and a mother, someone who's survived the unglamorous reality of trying to make a halfway decent dinner with a screaming baby on her hip and lived to see the other side. Her recipes are nothing if not family friendly. The vast majority are actually simple to cook, and my kids have willingly eaten all of the five or so recipes I've tried so far.

Bottom line: If you want to re-spark the joy of cooking and are living with tiny humans, this one is a must read.

Finish by Jon Acuff

 

Deep reading category: Teaches me something specific

Star rating: Four-and-a-half stars

This book has been on my library hold list since it first came on my radar a few months ago, but I wish I'd shelled out and bought it instead. Acuff is already famous for titles like Start, which gives readers the kick in the pants to get going on a project, but Finish is what many of us creatives really need. How often do you jump into a new idea before seeing the last one through? (This is me raising my hand over here.)

Acuff breaks down all the sneaky ways perfectionism stops us from finishing the projects that really matter and how we can push through to the end anyway. I've never thought I had a problem with perfectionism, but Finish was a real eye-opener to all the ways perfectionism can disguise itself behind fear, "responsible" decisions, and other excuses. This book was a quick (and hilarious!) read that's perfect for dipping into whenever you have a moment.

Bottom line: Highly recommended for anyone, creative or otherwise, who has trouble completing goals or projects. (For more on this topic, check out the Chasing Creative episode on getting unstuck at the beginning, middle, and end of a project.)

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert

 

Deep reading category: Outstanding writing

Star rating: Three-and-a-half stars

The Hazel Wood is an un-put-downable YA novel that takes readers into fairytales dark enough to rival the original Grimm brothers themselves. I'm a sucker for both YA and any sort of fairytale spinoff, so this new release was a no-brainer for me. Plus that cover earns all the heart eyes! 

I was utterly taken in by the first half of the book, where we follow Alice Crewe, granddaughter of mysterious fairytale author Althea Prosperpine. Alice and her mother have never set down roots, always trying to escape the bad luck that seems to be chasing them. But things are taken to a whole new level when the mother-daughter duo receives word that the grandmother Alice has never known has died---and when creepy characters from Althea's stories start showing up in the real world.

The first half of the book reads like the best type of urban fantasy, but the second half takes readers into territory I wasn't crazy about. Let's just say there were some character choices that had my head spinning (nothing makes me crazier than character action that doesn't align with their previous behavior). Albert's writing style also devolved into purple metaphors that don't actually describe anything, probably in an effort to make the setting seem more atmospheric. This tactic didn't work for me in Caraval, and it didn't work for me here. 

Bottom line: This is a perfectly creepy Halloween read for fans of dark fairytales, but I feel like a lot of the book's potential was lost. The author is currently working on a sequel, but the jury's still out on whether I'll be continuing the series.